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Old 06-21-2011, 04:26 AM
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Default Re: The "promiscuous woman" walk

Quote:
Originally Posted by IT View Post
Provocative clothing has lots its meaning in today's world in my opinion. Who are women actually provoking by dressing up in these 'provocative clothes'? The people who dress in 'standard clothes'? The men in general? The government? The general public? Nowadays there are so many clothing brands and styles that can be considered into the definition of provocative that they've lost their meaning. Teens trying to stand out from the crowd with this clothing have only formed a huge mass of their own. Young women who dress in these clothes have nearly formed a sub-culture in which older and older women take part in. It's not like dressing up in 'provocative clothes' is that much different from dressing in a bikini, which was considered provocative a few decades backwards but is now casual.
Agreed. It's interesting how things have changed. And I think I've illustrated the problem of culture in general as well. I'm not entirely sure why this is the case though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IT View Post
Rape in Western world countries is such a minor problem compared to developing, third world countries that it's not even amusing. It's wrong no matter where it occurs but I don't see how dressing up in a certain way and making a huge walk scene raises any positive awareness. Promoting something by attaching a negatively charged word to the matter promoted is generally not a good way of promoting. Would you promote homosexual rights with a 'Huge F****t Parade' rather than the current current Gay Pride Parade?
The thing is that at a grassroots and reactionary level, it should at least raise awareness of the problem close to home and allow young men and women who were forced into coercion to come out. In that sense, I think this is a positive aspect of the parade itself, as some of the rape victims do in fact join the walk.

It wasn't meant to solve the problem of rape anywhere outside of the US. I don't think that's a bad thing either. Cystic fibrosis is a freaking rare disease (1 in thousands), but we still research it for those few that are affected, and potentially develop new technologies to save a wider range of people. In this case, perhaps if it helps even 1 person come out against their rapist, it would be positive. I don't know, perhaps we might learn a thing or two about the power of people. Perhaps I'm optimistic as well.

Well Gay Pride is ironically identical in application. Remember that gay was an offensive word prior to its popular usage not as a derogatory term for homosexuals, but rather as a term for homosexuals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IT View Post
So, in my opinion, yes. The walk raises awareness but in the wrong way. The victims are the problem only as long as they themselves consider them to be part of the problem. Advertising your 'provocative' style publicly only further raises people's image of the victim being a cause to the rape problem as well.
That I think is a fair assessment of the issue of the walk as well. It's interesting to note that the general public would more likely than not brush it off like the gay pride parade (which ironically is very similar in it that a lot of the men and women wear barely anything either).
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